Why Colombian Coffee?

Why Colombian Coffee so great?

Colombia is one of the world’s top coffee exporters and we ship millions of bags of our finest beans abroad every year. But why is the world so in love with Colombian coffee? Here we explain how our perfect coffee-growing climate, coupled with our world-beating arabica beans and lovingly tended fincas all adds up to the perfect cup:

Why is Colombian coffee famous for?

Colombia’s coffee is world famous for its flavor and the unmistakable mild but rich aroma that rises from every brew. That may explain why we’ve been exporting our coffee for almost 200 years and, for most of that time, it’s been our top export. There are many secrets to our success but our geography is undeniably one of them. Coffee grows best in volcanic soil, at altitudes of 1,200 to 1,800 meters, in places that are free of frost but receive around 80 inches of rain a year. Colombia ticks all those boxes.

Where is Colombia’s coffee produced?

Colombia’s coffee zone or eje cafetero (Coffee Cultural Landscape) in the center of our country, produces most of our coffee. It spans the coffee growing areas of Caldas, Quindío, Risaralda and the north of Valle. But the coffee belt doesn’t get all the glory and the flavor of each bean varies according to its origin. Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Boyacá and the north of Tolima have similar conditions to the (Coffee Cultural Landscape) and also harvest all year round. The coffee grown in our warmer, more northerly, lower altitude zones – such as the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, the Perija mountains, Casanare, Santander and the North of Santander – has a lower acidity and a fuller body. Whereas the beans from the more southerly Nariño, Cauca, Huila and the south of Tolima grow at higher altitudes, closer to the equator, giving them a higher acidity and much sought-after sweetness. Colombia basically has a bean to suit every taste.

What makes our coffee special?

And that’s another secret to our success. Our beans. The world’s most important species of coffee shrub are the cofea arabica (arabica) and the cofea canephora (robusta) and everyone knows arabica has the best flavor (we may be a bit biased there but the clue is in the name, robusta is cheaper, contains more caffeine and has a bigger yield) Colombian coffee is 100% arabica. No surprises there.

How is Colombian coffee planted and harvested?

Our harvest is a game changer too. Some countries favor strip picking, which means pulling all the coffee cherries off the branch in one go, usually by machine. In mountainous Colombia, our norm is to “cherry pick” or select only the fully ripe cherries. Our coffee pickers examine a tree every 10 days or so and a good picker can harvest up to 90 kilos of ripe red cherries a day that way, around 18 kilos of coffee beans. Just thinking about it is enough to bring on a thirst. Time for a coffee break!

Colombian Tea.

The other Colombian drink.

olombia is known for many things like its coffees, but what most people don’t know Colombia for is its Colombian Teas. It is quite interesting to know that Colombia is a tea producing country. It started its tea production in 1950s when the country’s’ government started tea plantations after purchasing tea trees from Brazil. The plantation was done in three areas of the country as a means of diversifying agriculture. Though Colombia is not one of the foremost tea producing countries in the world, they have been able to develop a large variety of tea producing factories in the country.

One of the regions where the plantation was started is in Andes Mountains. Here, tea is planted and nurtured till maturity and harvested. Andes Mountains is known to be an exotic, peaceful as well as a beautiful place in Colombia. The tropical weather of the country makes it easy to harvest tea all year round. The weather condition of the country provides a comfortable atmosphere for the production of these teas. Teas are grown in soil with high concentration of copper, zinc coal and nitrogen. Teas produced in Colombia are low in acidity, sweet and soft. And the consistent climate aids in the high yield of tasty and delicate tea-tips all year round.

Colombian teas are planted in a unique way making them special in several aspects. The trees are planted short and spaced out, and often, the trees are made up of different varieties, mainly a mix of assamica, Cambodian and sinensis. This combination results in a natural mixture of tea leaves in every harvest. However, someone can be forgiven for not knowing about Colombian teas because tea market in the country has had it a bit difficult to grow, and this is largely due to the country’s strong coffee culture.


Colombian Tea.

The other Colombian drink.

olombia is known for many things like its coffees, but what most people don’t know Colombia for is its Colombian Teas. It is quite interesting to know that Colombia is a tea producing country. It started its tea production in 1950s when the country’s’ government started tea plantations after purchasing tea trees from Brazil. The plantation was done in three areas of the country as a means of diversifying agriculture. Though Colombia is not one of the foremost tea producing countries in the world, they have been able to develop a large variety of tea producing factories in the country.

One of the regions where the plantation was started is in Andes Mountains. Here, tea is planted and nurtured till maturity and harvested. Andes Mountains is known to be an exotic, peaceful as well as a beautiful place in Colombia. The tropical weather of the country makes it easy to harvest tea all year round. The weather condition of the country provides a comfortable atmosphere for the production of these teas. Teas are grown in soil with high concentration of copper, zinc coal and nitrogen. Teas produced in Colombia are low in acidity, sweet and soft. And the consistent climate aids in the high yield of tasty and delicate tea-tips all year round.

Colombian teas are planted in a unique way making them special in several aspects. The trees are planted short and spaced out, and often, the trees are made up of different varieties, mainly a mix of assamica, Cambodian and sinensis. This combination results in a natural mixture of tea leaves in every harvest. However, someone can be forgiven for not knowing about Colombian teas because tea market in the country has had it a bit difficult to grow, and this is largely due to the country’s strong coffee culture.


Colombian Tea.

The other Colombian drink.

olombia is known for many things like its coffees, but what most people don’t know Colombia for is its Colombian Teas. It is quite interesting to know that Colombia is a tea producing country. It started its tea production in 1950s when the country’s’ government started tea plantations after purchasing tea trees from Brazil. The plantation was done in three areas of the country as a means of diversifying agriculture. Though Colombia is not one of the foremost tea producing countries in the world, they have been able to develop a large variety of tea producing factories in the country.

One of the regions where the plantation was started is in Andes Mountains. Here, tea is planted and nurtured till maturity and harvested. Andes Mountains is known to be an exotic, peaceful as well as a beautiful place in Colombia. The tropical weather of the country makes it easy to harvest tea all year round. The weather condition of the country provides a comfortable atmosphere for the production of these teas. Teas are grown in soil with high concentration of copper, zinc coal and nitrogen. Teas produced in Colombia are low in acidity, sweet and soft. And the consistent climate aids in the high yield of tasty and delicate tea-tips all year round.

Colombian teas are planted in a unique way making them special in several aspects. The trees are planted short and spaced out, and often, the trees are made up of different varieties, mainly a mix of assamica, Cambodian and sinensis. This combination results in a natural mixture of tea leaves in every harvest. However, someone can be forgiven for not knowing about Colombian teas because tea market in the country has had it a bit difficult to grow, and this is largely due to the country’s strong coffee culture.


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